Twilight: New Moon

New moonFor Bella Swan, there is one thing more important than life itself: Edward Cullen. But being in love with a vampire is more dangerous than Bella ever could have imagined. Edward has already rescued Bella from the clutches of an evil vampire, but now, as their daring relationship threatens all that is near and dear to them, they realize their troubles may just be beginning….

Legions of readers entranced by the New York Times bestseller Twilight are hungry for more, and they won’t be disappointed by this gripping sequel. In New Moon, Stephenie Meyer delivers another irresistible combination of romance and suspense with a supernatural twist. Passionate, riveting, and deeply moving, this vampire love saga is well on its way to literary immortality.

 

You may be wondering why I have decided to review the second book in the saga, instead of the first? The reason being was that this book in comparison to the rest, was so depressing. It was one of those reads where you’re thankful above all else that it’s over.

In the first book we become acquainted with the first sparks of first love, which is so exciting; with its new/unexplored experiences. The first kiss, first hand holding, secrets shared, or in this case secrets found out by Bella, from her friend Jacob. Going into New Moon you know that the love between Edward and Bella would surely have its obstacles given Edward’s vampire background, along with the danger that Bella faced in the first book. What I did not expect was the sudden vanishing of Edward from Bella’s life. It’s the suddenness of Edward’s departure that both Bella and Edward begin to slip into the cloud of depression.

It’s a difficult process when the first love ends, even when the reasoning behind the split is with good intentions. In this book it proves to be impossible to get over. There’s a few tilts of the hat toward Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Personally from a writer’s point of view, I think that Stephenie Meyer might have been curious to see how Romeo and Juliet would have turned out in this day and age; mixing it all up with vampires and Werewolves. It was interesting but as I said before, it was also depressing. Bella remains trapped in this fog of despair that only Jacob can somewhat pull her out of. There was also a lot of contemplation of suicide, which rubbed me the wrong way. But then again, the mere idea of teenage suicide saddens me. Perhaps Meyer was trying to put in a clear message that suicide and the heartbreak of first love should never go together. Or maybe it was just the modern day spinoff of Romeo and Juliet; of which the thoughts stemmed from. It keeps you turning the pages, and you’ll let out a sigh of relief once you reach the end of the book, but it wouldn’t be a book that I’d want to read more than once. The other books I could, but this one not so much.

 

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6 thoughts on “Twilight: New Moon

    1. Lol! love that pun. I really wasn’t interested in the book series either because of the terrible film adaptations, but my desire to read as much YA fiction as possible, was what propelled me into reading it. They actually turned out to be interesting reads. I think if you’re able to look past all of the staring and the terrible adaptations, you might very well be in for a surprise.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes to research is to brush up on the lingo, though it wasn’t that long ago that I had been filed under that same category. So the staring didn’t help you with the ladies, Did you try tearing off your shirt and howling at the moon? If that does catch em like flies to honey, then perhaps we should try morphing you into a supernatural being.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Tearing off my shirt in the Boston heat would not have endeared me to anybody least of all myself and the cruel sunburn. Over in England it is more manageable, I’ll have a go at morphing into a ferret but I can’t promise anything!

        Liked by 1 person

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