Editors

Are there any manuscript editors out there that could answer the following questions in this post?

A few months ago I got in contact with an editor and I’ve been working with said editor for the past few months on my manuscript.

When I first started reading up about this editor it seemed like the editor would be a pretty good match for me. I check with the editors references and all of them gave good reviews; however I’ve been a bit apprehensive with the editor recently.

The editor gave me an estimate on the manuscript about two months back and during that time the manuscript was in the process of being revised. By the time the revisions were done the MS had gone from 35,758 words to 41,894. I told the editor about the word increase thinking that the price would rise, but it didn’t and as it stands now it’s still the same price. Now I’m no expert but doesn’t the editor usually have to go through the book before coming up with a price? (There’s a red flag in my opinion.)

Within past few days we’ve been discussing payment and I told the editor that I was going to have to borrow the money to make the payment; because my editor finished with the book faster than I thought. The editor was okay with that; however when I mentioned that it would be a few days to a week until I could pay my editor I received this reply…

I can wait a few days for you to get it together, but please do it as fast as
possible. This is my livelihood. You did have about a month while I had the book
to do this, after all.

Correct me if I’m wrong but shouldn’t the editor be more understanding and less concerned about receiving the payment?

I went over some sample chapters the editor sent me and I was happy with them, but that shot up another red flag. Usually when your working with an editor isn’t there usually a lot of back and forth over the book, and doesn’t the author have to look at the changes being made say in certain paragraphs or chapters?

If there are any editors or writer who have worked with editors out there that could give me some insight I’m all ears.

Oh yes and I have one more question shouldn’t there be a contract somewhere in the mix?

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30 thoughts on “Editors

  1. As a writer in the process of my second edit, this is my experience: Both editors asked for the first 50 pages of the manuscript to review prior to giving a quote, along with the total estimated word count. One of the editors, on the first edit, asked for the best chapter and the worst chapter to compare the differences–estimating the rest of the document would be somewhere in between. Both editors asked for 50% up front. But one worked with me and is taking 33% up front, 33% mid way through, and balance upon receipt of suggested revisions. No contract is needed, if an editor gives a quote, this is sufficient.

    Personally, I feel I have been treated well and understand that if an editor is doing this for a living, they should receive payment as agreed. That’s just a good business practice. As a writer we would never expect the reader to pay us after they were done reading the book when they have the money to do so. Just keep in mind, every bit of the writing process is worth what it takes to get the work finished. Commend yourself for full filing your dream of writing and publishing. Be true to yourself, do the best you can with the resources you have and when it’s published, that’s when the work really starts: getting the word out (literally) for people to know it’s there to read. All my best!
    P. Burroughs

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  2. The key red flag here, as far as I can see is the lack of a contract. How can either side know what to expect, or enforce performance in the absence of a binding agreement? I grew up in a time when you did things with a handshake, back inthe 50s, but those days are long past.

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  3. as far as I always understood, the editor shouldn’t be making ANY changes, just marking things that need fixing/ect… but then I could be wrong there I suppose.
    Also, I think there absolutely should be a contract of some form… One would think anyway.
    I can understand how they would be concerned about payment, as it is their livelihood, but I would think not until it is finished and there is happiness on your part. They are providing a service, doing a job, for you.

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    1. Yes they are providing a service and therefor shouldn’t be discussing payment until the job is done, and the customer is satisified I agree.
      But perhaps it might just be the way business is handled with editors.

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  4. No…an editor shouldn’t be more understanding and less concerned about receiving payment. Unless said editor is a good friend and maybe not even then. But this is purely a business transaction and if down the road you guys can form a friendship…that’s a bonus. I learned the hard way last year when my book was being edited/proofed I was stuck with incompleteness in my book and my soul a week before it was due to release. Usually editors give up fronts like $5/page or $12/page. And if you were happy w/chapter changes, count yourself blessed.

    Also, if the editor didn’t charge you for the 5,ooo+ extra words added, that should count for something. Honestly, the editor seems fair with the willingness to wait a few extra days. If you two have been working together the past few months and it’s been fine, Where is the problem?

    The best advice I can give is to treat these relationships professionally, keep it business. But I think the most important thing to do is to go with your gut. Red flags are not just red flags, they are your intuition, that inner voice saying RUN AWAY!

    I hope everything turns out the way you want. Lots of luck on your upcoming work.

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    1. I didn’t know about the $5 per page and I guess I should consider myself lucky that I wasn’t charged extra for the 5,000 plus words.
      However there are red flags up, but perhaps it’s my fear of being ripped off that’s causing it.

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      1. I’m right there with you.It’s so scary too because people will take advantage of indie authors. I checked out some editors’ pages where they charge $12/page and I did not see any award-winning books in their arsenal like they claimed.

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  5. Chelsea, I think I told you before, there are many subpar or borderline fraudulent editors out there. You don’t have a contract – how is that even possible? No terms and conditions? No immediate input? I think you’re going to get some grammar and spelling touch ups and a big invoice. Editing should be done as part of the publishing process; anyone editing beforehand is likely scamming you.

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    1. Yes you did mention this before, but I really did think that an editor would be helpful; as long as the referneces were good and the editor knew what they were talking about.
      You’re right though without a contract I’m just asking to be ripped off.

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      1. At this point, send your book out to some beta readers that you trust and who have some writing ability, that way no money changes hands. They’ll give you high-level feedback for free. It’s not the same thing as editing, but you should be your own editor once you know what people think about your book. That will allow you to polish your story and get the book out to an agent, who hopefully will engage a publisher, and then you will be able to work with a real professional editor.

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      2. I’ve read both of your comments and I just want to let you know that I agree with both you and Heather. The book is still a mess and I do need to learn my craft. I also am trying to get in touch with a bata reader as well.

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      3. Keep writing Chelsea. You have a good imagination. That’s a big part of the battle. Now practice your writing so that the good ideas come out in the best way possible.

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  6. I can only speak from my own editing experience, but I would ask for a summary and the first 50 pages, then we would settle on a project price or hourly rate, from that would come the contract, and a percentage would be paid up front with the remainder paid when the project was finished to mutual satisfaction. I would also – after perusing the summary and 50 pages – likely be able to give a tentative finish date and payment due date. If I finished early, that would be on me, and the due date would not change. I mean, if you paid early hoorah, but the contracted date would still stand.

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  7. When my daughter was working on her book several years ago we had the #1 necessary item…a contract. It stated the charges we were to expect and when each payment had to be made. It also stated how long the contract was valid for so if the book took 6 months to edit or three months to edit, the contract was in force for the entire time. They worked on 1-2 chapters at a time rather than the entire book all at once and they met about every 2 weeks. This all was agreed upon before they even started the editing process so there were no surprises for anyone.

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  8. My experience is this: My agent suggested I work with editor to deal with some serious organizational problems. (non-fiction memoir/self-help book) My editor charges me by the hour.
    Scope of work has been very clear. “I’m going to read whole ms. Should take approx this many hours. Will contact if I am going over.” Once we began the work in earnest, I would send chapter, she’d comment, I would respond to suggestions, ask questions, make changes. Each chapter went back and forth many times, putting each one to bed when satisfied.

    She’s not re-writing in any way. I have final say, obviously, and have sent finished chapters in bundles to agent, who ALSO had editorial comments.

    As for billing, she bills every 2 weeks and I pay when billed. That way the amount never gets really high.

    I assume you’re talking about a ms. that you are getting into shape to submit to agents or publishers or you’re preparing to self- publish. The only “free” editing is done by an editor employed by a publishing house. (As I said, my agent is a sharp editor, but I’ve heard this isn’t so for all agents. I don’t pay her. She’s got a standard contract with me to be paid her percentage when she sells my ms.)

    Hope this helps.

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  9. I commented back on your first entry about hiring an editor. Please understand that everything I’m about to say has your best interests at heart, and I’d really appreciate it if you would sit down and consider it more than a brief “Good point, I’ll think about it” response comment. I don’t feel like you considered what I was warning you about last time, and now you’re in a hell of a sticky situation that could have been avoided.

    From seeing what you’ve posted on this website, Jenny Mac is nowhere near ready to be published. It is also nowhere near being picked up by a reputable editor or agent because it would take more work than it was worth to them to get it to publishing form. Back when you wanted to hire this editor, my suggestion was to go through some writing communities like the forums on NaNoWriMo or Absolute Write’s newbies or hookups threads and find some betas or critique partners before you hired an editor. Jenny Mac is not ready for a professional editor. It just isn’t. I know it’s your baby, I know you’ve worked eight years on it, but it’s also a first manuscript, and I wrote three books before I had anything even vaguely worth publishing.

    In order to get your writing into publishable shape, you need some help–either from writing classes, writing seminars, or from working intensively with critique partners. Just going through your posts here, you have POV issues, you don’t have a strong narrative voice, you tell readers what is happening rather than allowing them to figure it out on their own, your descriptions are minimal, you rely on stiff, stilted dialogue to tell your readers everything, and your characters are virtually indistinguishable from one another, with no individual characteristics, feelings, or attitudes. Any reputable editor, agent, or publisher would tell you this. They would say that you need to work on your craft more. They would say that Jenny Mac, no matter how important it is to you, is probably not the book that is going to get you published, especially not in the state it’s in right now.

    With all of that covered… The editor you picked up is not an editor connected to any agents or publishers (I’m guessing). She takes manuscripts, marks her edits, charges you, and sends you on your way. She does this basic editing for lots of people without necessarily putting in a whole lot of love to the manuscript, because it’s a quick payday, not a book her name is going to be on if it’s published. She does not work for a publishing house, so you’re not going to get the developmental, line, copy edits, and proofing that you would get from a house editor. You get basic edits.

    I hate to tell you this, but she doesn’t care what happens to you or your book. All she cares about is making her money, and that’s exactly what she’s done to you. She’s doing her job, sure, but her job doesn’t involve working with you in the long run. Your manuscript is edited, and bam, you’re out the door with no more help. You just burned yourself a thousand-plus dollars and you’re not any closer to getting Jenny Mac published.

    About the editor’s services:
    –freelance editors will request a sample and price based off that–so no, she doesn’t have to go through the whole book to price
    –she should be marking things in your manuscript with comments or changing them with track changes that you can approve or decline, not actually changing anything without marking it
    –like I said, she’s not a house dev or line editor, so she’s not going to go “back and forth” with you over plot points or whatever; that’s a house editor’s job
    –most freelance editors of this woman’s caliber do not have clients sign contracts; publishing houses do
    –she’s not going to be “more understanding” about getting payment–and really, she shouldn’t be. It’s been a month, she completed her services, and now you’re expected to pay. It’s like going to Subway, asking for a sandwich, and then at the end telling them you need a few days to get money together to pay for it. She totally didn’t have your best interests at heart when she agreed to work on your MS, because Jenny Mac as it is is not ready to be professionally edited, but that doesn’t mean that she doesn’t have the right to her payment. You agreed to her terms, and now her job is done. It doesn’t matter how much you feel she’s done, how demanding she is, or how much more you want from her. She did what she told you she’d do; if you wanted more clarification about how the process was going to go (“back and forth,” what kind of edits she was doing–dev, basic, line–, if she offered chatting after she was done editing, etcetera), then you should have asked before it began. Knowledge is power. You went in to this with a lack of knowledge.

    In short: yes, you’ve been ripped off. I meant it when I said communities like Absolute Write are necessary resources for aspiring writers. I and multiple other people warned you back when you first mentioned this editor, but you went ahead with it. Now it’s too late to do anything but consider this a learning experience.

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    1. I remember your recommendation from a few months back. At the time I thought that perhaps an editor would be better because they were in the business and they knew what would need to be done to take it to the next level. However you were correct the first time around and I should’ve listened. (I’m sure that you already know that I can be stubborn.) You’re correct about the book, I do need to learn my craft and so I’ve contacted a bata reader.
      Thank you for your honesty Heather.

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      1. I understand the drive to want to have your book out there. I do. I’m in the business, too. I worked as a freelance editor and now I make my living writing books. So I know how you feel.

        I want to caution you about a beta–a beta reader is someone who goes through your stuff and looks for glaring errors. A beta reader is not someone who’s meant to teach you the finer points of writing. I really, truly think you should look at some writing classes. Start reading more. Go to some critique sessions.

        This is from your last Jenny Mac post:
        “And we think that you’re right Brenda, Jenny just might be the only one who could stop Joseph,” said Ginger.

        “But June had the psychic abilities as well and it didn’t help then.”

        “June stopped listening to her visions long ago, if she did listen, they’d both still be here.

        Jenny’s different than her mother,” said Marie.

        “She gave up, Jenny’s a fighter, she’ll never give up until she knows that it’s over for good,” said William.

        “Alright I’ll tell her, but when I do, I think it would be best for all of you to head on home tonight.”

        “Why?” asked Thomas.

        If I was your writing instructor, these are questions I would have:
        –Whose point of view is this scene in? Who are we closest to? Doing third person omniscient (where the narrator knows what everyone is thinking) is hard even for a seasoned writer. Whose inner thoughts and feelings are we exploring here? Whose should we be exploring? (You like Harry Potter, so here’s an example–the HP books were in third person POV, but they stuck with Harry’s inner thoughts and feelings most of the time. You need to pick a character, presumably Jenny, since she’s the titular MC, and explore her.
        –Grammar? Editors can live with a few grammatical errors, but there’s a ton going wrong here. The best way to teach yourself better grammar is to read more often and see how people use things like commas.
        –Is this dialogue realistic? Not really. This is what we call expositional dialogue–you’re telling readers by having your characters say what’s happening. This dialogue also makes characters totally the same. No one has any distinguishing characteristics.
        –I think that’s my biggest problem: that your characters have no features. They’re cardboard, not real people. How can you make them better?
        –There is zero emotion in this scene. Where’s the tenseness? Where’s the conflict? Where’s the edge-of-my-seat? I’m reading flat writing with flat characters.

        I don’t know how much more advice I can give. Your writing isn’t ready for publication. Instead of finding editors or beta readers for Jenny Mac, your best bet is to step back, put Jenny Mac down, put Chester down, and take some basic story writing courses, either online or at a local college. That may seem like it’s too basic, and you may think you’re too ahead of the curve to take classes, but you NEED to do something different than what you’ve been doing. Right now, writing is not a viable career for you. With your skills as they are, you’re never going to make it. In order to change that, you need to be proactive and change things.

        Again, this sounds harsh, but remember that I’ve been where you are. These are things I told myself, things I learned, and I got a long ways on this advice. I want to help you with your writing. But I also want to help you be realistic–I don’t want you to avoid seeking another career path, or even another part-time job, because you think it will compromise your writing. Plenty of people get full-time jobs and still write books. Take a couple years to take time and learn how to write before you try to make a career out of it.

        I know, I KNOW that you can look at books like Harry Potter and see that your writing is not there. You’re a smart girl. You know you’re not there yet. So stop tugging your focus apart–stop submitting to agents, stop editing. Step away from all your projects. Take writing classes. Look on the Absolute Write forums. I am dead serious. There are millions of wannabee writers out there, and the only thing that separates them from published authors is practice. You’re not getting the kind of practice you need on your own, and I don’t see you taking people’s advice when they try to critique you on this blog, so. Right now you’re treading water. I understand the drive to want to have your book out there. I do. I’m in the business, too. I worked as a freelance editor and now I make my living writing books. So I know how you feel.

        I want to caution you about a beta–a beta reader is someone who goes through your stuff and looks for glaring errors. A beta reader is not someone who’s meant to teach you the finer points of writing. I really, truly think you should look at some writing classes. Start reading more. Go to some critique sessions.

        This is from your last Jenny Mac post:
        “And we think that you’re right Brenda, Jenny just might be the only one who could stop Joseph,” said Ginger.

        “But June had the psychic abilities as well and it didn’t help then.”

        “June stopped listening to her visions long ago, if she did listen, they’d both still be here.

        Jenny’s different than her mother,” said Marie.

        “She gave up, Jenny’s a fighter, she’ll never give up until she knows that it’s over for good,” said William.

        “Alright I’ll tell her, but when I do, I think it would be best for all of you to head on home tonight.”

        “Why?” asked Thomas.

        If I was your writing instructor, these are questions I would have:
        –Whose point of view is this scene in? Who are we closest to? Doing third person omniscient (where the narrator knows what everyone is thinking) is hard even for a seasoned writer. Whose inner thoughts and feelings are we exploring here? Whose should we be exploring? (You like Harry Potter, so here’s an example–the HP books were in third person POV, but they stuck with Harry’s inner thoughts and feelings most of the time. You need to pick a character, presumably Jenny, since she’s the titular MC, and explore her.
        –Grammar? Editors can live with a few grammatical errors, but there’s a ton going wrong here. The best way to teach yourself better grammar is to read more often and see how people use things like commas.
        –Is this dialogue realistic? Not really. This is what we call expositional dialogue–you’re telling readers by having your characters say what’s happening. This dialogue also makes characters totally the same. No one has any distinguishing characteristics.
        –I think that’s my biggest problem: that your characters have no features. They’re cardboard, not real people. How can you make them better?
        –There is zero emotion in this scene. Where’s the tenseness? Where’s the conflict? Where’s the edge-of-my-seat? I’m reading flat writing with flat characters.

        I don’t know how much more advice I can give. Your writing isn’t ready for publication. Instead of finding editors or beta readers for Jenny Mac, your best bet is to step back, put Jenny Mac down, put Chester down, and take some basic story writing courses, either online or at a local college. That may seem like it’s too basic, and you may think you’re too ahead of the curve to take classes, but you NEED to do something different than what you’ve been doing. Right now, writing is not a viable career for you. With your skills as they are, you’re never going to make it. In order to change that, you need to be proactive and change things.

        Again, this sounds harsh, but remember that I’ve been where you are. These are things I told myself, things I learned, and I got a long ways on this advice. I want to help you with your writing. But I also want to help you be realistic–I don’t want you to avoid seeking another career path, or even another part-time job, because you think it will compromise your writing. Plenty of people get full-time jobs and still write books. Take a couple years to take time and learn how to write before you try to make a career out of it.

        I know, I KNOW that you can look at books like Harry Potter and see that your writing is not there. You’re a smart girl. You know you’re not there yet. So stop tugging your focus apart–stop submitting to agents, stop editing. Step away from all your projects. Take writing classes. Look on the Absolute Write forums. I am dead serious. There are millions of wannabee writers out there, and the only thing that separates them from published authors is practice. You’re not getting the kind of practice you need on your own, and I don’t see you taking people’s advice when they try to critique you on this blog, so. Right now you’re barely treading water, and you need to learn how to swim.

        Like

      2. Woop, I’m not sure why that posted weird. Here’s the actual full reply, properly formatted:

        I understand the drive to want to have your book out there. I do. I’m in the business, too. I worked as a freelance editor and now I make my living writing books. So I know how you feel.

        I want to caution you about a beta–a beta reader is someone who goes through your stuff and looks for glaring errors. A beta reader is not someone who’s meant to teach you the finer points of writing. I really, truly think you should look at some writing classes. Start reading more. Go to some critique sessions.

        This is from your last Jenny Mac post:
        “And we think that you’re right Brenda, Jenny just might be the only one who could stop Joseph,” said Ginger.

        “But June had the psychic abilities as well and it didn’t help then.”

        “June stopped listening to her visions long ago, if she did listen, they’d both still be here.

        Jenny’s different than her mother,” said Marie.

        “She gave up, Jenny’s a fighter, she’ll never give up until she knows that it’s over for good,” said William.

        “Alright I’ll tell her, but when I do, I think it would be best for all of you to head on home tonight.”

        “Why?” asked Thomas.

        If I was your writing instructor, these are questions I would have:
        –Whose point of view is this scene in? Who are we closest to? Doing third person omniscient (where the narrator knows what everyone is thinking) is hard even for a seasoned writer. Whose inner thoughts and feelings are we exploring here? Whose should we be exploring? (You like Harry Potter, so here’s an example–the HP books were in third person POV, but they stuck with Harry’s inner thoughts and feelings most of the time. You need to pick a character, presumably Jenny, since she’s the titular MC, and explore her.
        –Grammar? Editors can live with a few grammatical errors, but there’s a ton going wrong here. The best way to teach yourself better grammar is to read more often and see how people use things like commas.
        –Is this dialogue realistic? Not really. This is what we call expositional dialogue–you’re telling readers by having your characters say what’s happening. This dialogue also makes characters totally the same. No one has any distinguishing characteristics.
        –I think that’s my biggest problem: that your characters have no features. They’re cardboard, not real people. How can you make them better?
        –There is zero emotion in this scene. Where’s the tenseness? Where’s the conflict? Where’s the edge-of-my-seat? I’m reading flat writing with flat characters.

        I don’t know how much more advice I can give. Your writing isn’t ready for publication. Instead of finding editors or beta readers for Jenny Mac, your best bet is to step back, put Jenny Mac down, put Chester down, and take some basic story writing courses, either online or at a local college. That may seem like it’s too basic, and you may think you’re too ahead of the curve to take classes, but you NEED to do something different than what you’ve been doing. Right now, writing is not a viable career for you. With your skills as they are, you’re never going to make it. In order to change that, you need to be proactive and change things.

        Again, this sounds harsh, but remember that I’ve been where you are. These are things I told myself, things I learned, and I got a long ways on this advice. I want to help you with your writing. But I also want to help you be realistic–I don’t want you to avoid seeking another career path, or even another part-time job, because you think it will compromise your writing. Plenty of people get full-time jobs and still write books. Take a couple years to take time and learn how to write before you try to make a career out of it.

        I know, I KNOW that you can look at books like Harry Potter and see that your writing is not there. You’re a smart girl. You know you’re not there yet. So stop tugging your focus apart–stop submitting to agents, stop editing. Step away from all your projects. Take writing classes. Look on the Absolute Write forums. I am dead serious. There are millions of wannabee writers out there, and the only thing that separates them from published authors is practice. You’re not getting the kind of practice you need on your own, and I don’t see you taking people’s advice when they try to critique you on this blog, so. Right now you’re barely treading water, and you need to learn how to swim.

        Like

  10. Chelsea, I just read Heather’s comments and she is bang on right. Don’t be discouraged by this, but you have a long long long way to go in terms of developing your writing skills. The stuff I have seen is poor to really bad. I think you have good ideas but no idea of how to execute or practice in writing. Writing is art and skill. It is practice and learning. The most characteristic thing about the Jenny Mac stuff I have read is that it’s extremely dialogue-heavy, as though you’re writing out conversations that you have with people, with no real plot and every chapter ends with “and then she went to bed” or “then he decided to do his homework” or something like that. I keep telling you, show don’t tell. You don’t really respond to that comment and I wonder if you understand or have the dedication to learn that.

    If I had to give you my two cents worth on the subject of Jenny Mac, I would honestly say that it’s nice to have a dream like this, but put it aside for a long while and learn your craft. Write short stories, blog posts, anything, just keep writing, practice, learn, and then go back and read your manuscript and see what you think.

    I’m actually happy someone said something blunt to you. I think Heather’s comments indicate that she is trying to help you, and I hope you listen to her. This is the type of thing that, if you take it to heart, can really put you on the road to realizing your dreams. It might be a long road, but nothing worthwhile ever comes easy.

    Like

  11. Yikes, Chelsea! I know we set ourselves up for harsh opinions and words when asking for feedback, but wow…just wow. Let me say this to you, I HOPE you will continue your journey of writing and working to make Jenny Mac what YOU want it to be!

    Secondly, if you are in a position to stay home and write, PLEASE DO IT because those opportunities are hard to come by. It took me so many years (30 to be exact) to finally put my foot down, quit working and just write. Sometimes I’d work 40-70 hours a week, find a babysitter on off time and spend 16-20 hours/day handwriting a story and ideas.That didn’t work for me. Working part-time gave me extra time, but something was still missing. I took temp positions to free up extra time w/o extra commitment to a regular gig. The temping was more successful in that I could work a month and have a week or two off, but something was still missing.

    As I approached the BIG 4 O, I decided not to go back to work…down went my foot, off went my imagination and up went my word and page count. This is my experience, but I wanted to share it with you and hope it helps a little. You know your situation better than anyone out there. NEVER give up on your dreams and NEVER listen to people who hint that you should look for another career. GO WITH YOUR GUT! Work or don’t work, but keep writing and don’t let anything or anyone compromise what you are trying to achieve.

    I am happy that you didn’t stop blogging after a few of those berating comments about your writing and that should show you that you definitely have the chops to stay in the game. And it is NEVER okay for anyone to speak/write to you in that manner. Remember, no matter how good a writer is at editing their own work, they still need someone to look it over to find things to be fixed…and there will always be something even the most seasoned writer needs fixed.

    Of course, best wishes to you and luck on Jenny Mac and your other endeavors!

    Like

    1. First off let me just say thank you because I needed to hear that. After going through those harsh comments it was hard to pick myself back up and keep going.
      I am going to continue with my writing I can promise you that; I know that I do have talent, I might need a few pointers along the way, but I do know that I shouldn’t just stop writing. Just because they don’t like my writing dosen’t mean others won’t like it either. Perhaps I’m just not their cup of tea and that’s fine I don’t expect to be.
      Once again thank you.

      Like

    2. I completely agree. Writing is a journey. Your journey, not anyone else’s. And I believe the job of an editor is to polish the story to make it glimmer. All my best!!!!!

      Like

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