Rejected

Well I’m sorry to say that Jenny Mac has just had it’s first rejection.

Ouch.

I got a lovely little thanks but no thanks letter along with my sent back sample chapter and synopsis.

So I guess I should start looking for another agency to research.

Huh sigh but I think the first rejection is always the hardest, so at least it’s out of the way.

Looks like I have some work to do I’d better get started.

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118 thoughts on “Rejected

  1. Don’t worry about it; wait until you have hundreds, or thousands of rejections. I’ve been writing for enough years to have a trunk full of rejection slips. They’re not terminal, and you shouldn’t let them discourage you.

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  2. Getting any reply at all is a good sign, actually. I sent out about twenty query letters to agents on Catskinner’s Book and got back less than ten replies, most of which were clearly automated.

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  3. Rejections suck. I’ve got my fair share of them. Chin up! If you’ve got a good manuscript, then there’s an agent out there somewhere to represent it. And if you can’t find one, self-publish! 😀

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  4. I’m sorry, this agent rejected you. You are in good company. I queried around 17 agents only one took the time to comment about my story, not feed back just that it was interesting but not for her.
    Time to sigh and send it out to the next agent on your list.

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  5. the way i see it, its a rite of passage, it’s almost like i have to get “x” number of rejections before I can be successful. So everytime i get one i feel like i moved one step closer to my goal.

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  6. Rejections are badges of honor. Keep them. Put them in a notebook. Treasure them. Not to be malicious, but to hang on to them as warriors do battlescars.

    They’re cool. They show chutzpah. Mojo. They also prove that you’ve been brave.

    And keep submitting.

    Or consider self-publishing. (I haven’t perused your site yet, so I am not sure about your stances on that, but it’s not a bad thing.)

    And thanks for visiting my blog. 🙂

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  7. I love your “pick myself up and dust off the rejection” attitude. If it make you feel better, my novel Treasure Traitor was rejected 34 times and I had totally given up on it, when a publisher contacted ME! Turns out one of the assistants at an agency I submitted to switched companies and pitched the novel to the head editor there. So keep up those contacts! Remember the “little people” who help you along the way, because they just might be the ones who get you through the gate keepers.

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  8. I had an agent write and say, “alas I must reject your work.” She should have said “I have the power to make you feel bad and I am exercising that power now.” Don’t listen. Keep trying.

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  9. Contact the publisher and ask for specific feedback. Do this with several publishers and compare their remarks (I don’t remember where I read this tip, must be somewhere else on WP). If they’re more or less focusing on the same aspect you may even be able to improve your work. (Don’t let it depend on one publisher’s opinion though.) Keep going!

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  10. Hang in there I know there are going to be many rejections as I myself have been here. But trust me that one yes that comes will be so with it. I haven’t gotten my yes yet but I know I will I can feel it coming. Till then I continue to self publish myself.

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  11. Blimey. Have they seen the comments on your blog. They need to. You ahve obviously been super-successful at building your audience. Have they given you any feedback? Could you ask for some? Politely … Cathy x

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  12. You should pour a glass of wine and toast your accomplishment!! The rejection is part of every writers journey and that just means you have done something that most never do… Write your story! Cheers!

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  13. The first rejection is always the hardest…for me it was an agent I really wanted and had researched a lot, I tried to act like I wans’t bothered by it but I was. Now I have quite a few rejections, I call them feul for the fire, because they’re my inspiration to keep writing and improving my work 🙂

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  14. I hit the ‘like’ button but want to assure you, it’s not because I like the fact you got a rejection slip! :p I hope you keep your slip – then you can smugly wave it about when you finally get published, ha ha!

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    1. Thank you and that would be something I would do knowing me.
      “Ha and you thought my work wasn’t worthwile well another agency thought so.”
      That would probably be pretty close to what I would say when that day comes. 🙂

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  15. Chelsea, remember to target agencies and publishers who are into what you do. Above all, this is most important. You’ll still get rejection letters, but your chances of being signed are much better. You’ll get there, girl!!!

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  16. Any one in sales knows the adage, Every no brings you one step closer to a yes.

    Small consolation I’m sure, but it has held true through the years.

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  17. rejections do stink especially when they are impersonal form letters, but for every one you have received, a famous work or now published author has most likely gotten one as well. Keep your head up! 🙂

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  18. I got two rejections from the same agent but first was the generic “dear author” blah blah and the second one was more specific and addressed me by name. I never received any of my manuscript sections back though. Anyways, point being I felt doubly rejected by the same agent, as if they said no but second guessed and then reevaluated and said a final no. However, I’m new to this so I have no idea if that sort of response is standard.

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  19. Hi Chels! You are right–the first one is always the hardest, and let me just say: you get calluses (more than thick skin) after a while, so at least there is that. I love your site…and am an instant fan. If you want to chuckle at some of my misadventures in the pub process–come check the pub process category at my place when you’re at loose ends. We have all been there, GF!! And we’ll get to the other “there”..too…the bestseller, there. Keep the faith. 🙂

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  20. Merry Meet Chelsea, rejection is only one person’s opinion. Make sure you show and not tell your story. May I suggest you see your story as onstage play. See your characters enter the scene.
    I hope this helps. 🙂

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  21. for what its worth I find the entire querry/pitch process like trying to buy the pretty girl at the bar a drink. the only diffrence is it generally dosn’t take the girl between 1 and 4 weeks to kick you in the . all you can do is stan back up breath and keep on trying.

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  22. Rejection is tough, but hang in there. Patience, persistance and a burning desire will get you there. I hope you watch The Cafe, a sweet series on PBS which tells the story of Sarah Porter, budding writer. Dianne

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  23. I think many times when people get rejected by some ‘authority’ be it for a publisher or any other job interview, they are so shocked/disappointed/offended/hurt in some way that that is where it stops.

    I think that is a bad idea, that we should go back and ask: “Why?”

    This way we can learn how to have a better chance with our next attempt.

    If we get ‘fobbed off’ ( maybe they did not even bother to read it?) we can have more confidence that it was not the work that was rejected. If they give us reasons we can evaluate their reasoning and take what action may be appropriate.

    This helps both us and them and any decent publisher will do what they can to help (time permitting) If at all possible a person to person ‘rejection reply’ would be preferable as is more likely to have some feedback. make an appointment with the person who signed the letter (if it was signed)

    Don’t take it personally and good luck !

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